Tag Archives: dessert

Rum raisin creamy frozen yogurt

Rum and raisin frozen yogurt

To celebrate the hottest summer in many many years – or as far as my memories of London can stretch- I give you a lovely frozen yogurt embellished by a touch of  spirit! and a scatter of sultanas.

IMG_7415 Ingredients list:

  • Demerara sugar 200g
  • Water 150ml
  • Raisins sultanas 200g
  • Greek yogurt 1 L pot
  • Vanilla in “jelly” or vanilla bean, scraped
  • Dark rum

Make a syrup with 200g of sugar, two capfuls of dark rum and a small glass (150ml) of water. Melt all of the sugar and reduce the syrup a little bit but without getting to a boil: You do not want to get to a caramel ! Switch off : Throw the raisins in the pan and get them to soak the juice for a little while.
Leave to cool.

Mix a large tub of Greek yogurt (1L) with the cooled syrup and a small spoonful of vanilla jelly – I have just discovered this product and I love it: it’s great and easy to use in puddings and pastry, plus it lasts longer and there is less wastage than with vanilla pods. In the Uk, it is sold at Waitrose: try the Organic vanilla bean paste by Taylor and Colledge.

Beat the yogurt with a whisk, add some rum to taste and pour the mix into your ice-cream maker or just into a container and in the freezer.

The tangy yogurt complements the rum and vanilla flavour so well I do not know why I had not thought of it earlier… This frozen yogurt is delicious and goes very well with fresh brownies. This is indeed how I served it last night to friends from Spain on a very hot summer evening in London… But this week-end, should the nice weather continue to hold, I am heading to West Wittering, my favourite British beach… See you on Monday!

I scream for Ice scream! except that's a yogurt...

I scream for Ice cream! Except that’s a yogurt…

 

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Creole Bread and Butter pudding with rum sauce

This very decadent and irresistible recipe was given to me by my friend Marie-Lorraine who herself got it from a friend: the sort of word-of-mouth recipe that makes you salivate as soon as you hear about it… It is thought to have originated in New-Orleans but there are enough similar recipes in the UK for it to earn its place on this blog.

I used the stale brioche made the week before, which was lucky timing, but you can use any stale sandwich bread or a bought brioche. The trick is to cover the slices with the liquid and let it steep for a while- which I sadly did not have time to do!

Comfort food at its best...

Comfort food at its best…

Ingredients list:

  • Eggs,2
  • Caster sugar, 150g
  • Whipping cream, 230ml
  • Full fat milk, 700ml
  • Butter, 100g
  • Vanilla extract, 1 drop
  • Bitter almond extract, 1 drop
  • Currants raisins, ½ cup or small handful
  • Nutmeg, 1 tsp
  • Stale white bread or brioche, 225g or about

First weigh the bread and cut it up in thick slices.

In a bowl, combine the eggs, sugar, milk, cream, butter, vanilla and almond extract, currants and nutmeg. Whisk to blend well.

Stuff the slices into the bowl and let them steep in ideally for 30 minutes or more. Or you can also just dip each slice into the bowl, then arrange them snuggly and pour the rest over. Once you have arranged your slices  in a buttered dish, such as a rectangular pyrex or gratin dish, add more milk if necessary to cover it well and press down with a fork to absorb most of the liquid.

They should all fit tightly and without leaving any space.

Reserve in the fridge for a few hours or a night.

Put the dish in a hot oven at 160º C.

Bake until the top is golden so about 30/40 minutes. Let too cool down then dust some icing sugar on top before serving. Given the sugar content, this is obviously optional but looks good!

Prepare the sauce.

Ingredients list for the sauce:

  • Sugar, 200g
  • Butter, 60g
  • Whipping cream or creme fraiche, 45ml
  • Egg yolk, 1
  • Rum (or brandy) 60ml

In a thick bottomed saucepan, combine the sugar, butter, cream and place over the hob to bubble until it is all melted. Remove from the hob. Whisk the yolk and add it to the mix. Stir in your favourite rum!

Serve the bread and butter pudding warm in shallow cups or bowls with a side helping of the sauce. It is a cross between French toast and a spoon cake: moist and regressive… Enjoy, it’s winter…IMG_5346

IMG_5337

Light Agar posset with almond and orange blossom

Perfect for Red Nose Day

Perfect for Red Nose Day

The trouble with the British posset or the italian pannacotta is that they are full of cream and sometimes I want a pudding that is a little bit lighter than most. I have been experimenting with Agar Agar lately and – with a bit of trial and error- I managed to get some small successes!

This silky Agar pannacotta with orange blossom water is one of those: A fresh and creamy combination of almond milk, almond butter and orange blossom with the undertones of an oriental pudding ; recalling visions of elaborate flower’s water possets in overflowing banquets such as those described in The Arabian nights.

The story of Sharazad is my bedtime read at the moment and I am deeply enjoying plunging into a language as rich and expressive as a persian carpet…

The recipe itself come from a book on Agar recipes given to me by a kind friend and written by Cléa of Cleacuisine. Agar Agar has many health benefits and is a clever ingredient for anybody conscious of their waistline… I post this for the group of friends who came to cook with me yesterday and all enjoyed the taste of this dessert. Thanks for being so supportive and fun, I had a lovely time sharing tips and novel ingredients with you all!

Ingredients list

  • White almond butter (in health shops), 160g
  • Agave syrup, 10 tsp
  • Rice or almond milk, 400ml
  • Agar Agar powder, 4 small teaspoonful or 4 g
  • Orange blossom water, 2 Tbsp
  • A few drops of bitter almond essence

Mix the almond butter and the agave syrup in a small bowl.

Heat the milk until just below boiling point,then dissolve the agar powder in it and let it simmer for 30 seconds.

Mix in the sweetened almond cream until melted. Add the orange blossom water and a few drops of bitter almond essence to enhance the almond fragrance. This is also the reason why I use almond milk if I can rather than rice milk.

Pour into 6 individual pots or jars. Let it cool and reserve in the fridge until serving time. It is not necessary to take them out of the pans but you can if you wish. For a friends dinner I would probably serve them with a fresh raspberry and passion fruit sauce but that would raise the sugar content and I am so pleased those little desserts are sugar and dairy free I would not want to compromise tonight!

They are heavenly virtuous and that is what I want right now…

Spoon in and have your private Sharazad moment…

View of Istanbul and its port

View of Istanbul and its port

Fresh strawberry scones for summer

A pretty cardboard stand (try Asda or Paperchase) inspired my latest twist on the ubiquitous scone. I served a fresh batch with lightly whipped cream and freshly cut strawberries. No clotted cream, no jam. A very enjoyable summer version of a British classic. Version in French here!

Use whipping cream and whip it into peaks with a dash of vanilla extract and a spoonful of caster sugar.

This month’s idea – while waiting for summer to start…

Gateau de clementines or Clementine soufflé cake

>This moist and flavoursome cake is best made with tiny seedless clementines or satsumas. It contains no fat and no flour and is really a souffle in essence, but it is delicious eaten cold and even better the next day.

Ingredients list:
Clementines 7or 8
Eggs 6
Sugar 225g
Ground almond 250g
Bicarbonate of soda 1 tsp

First rinse the clementines and put them whole in a pan, just covered with water.
Put on low heat and let it simmer for about 2 hours – remember to check the water level!

Drain and cut up the fruit, removing pips if there are any – I choose the seedless variety for this cake.
Puree the fruit in a food processor. Reserve.

Preheat the oven to 180°.
Line and oil a cake tin. Take one with deep sides because this cake will rise.

Separate the eggs and whip the whites with a pinch of bicarbonate until they make soft peaks.

Beat the yolks, almond powder and sugar together. Add the rest of bicarbonate. Add the clementine puree.
Blend the whites in that mixture, being careful to fold them in without breaking them.

Optional : Add a Tbsp of rum or orange liqueur if you wish.

Bake for 45 min. Cover with some foil half-way through if the top is colouring too quickly.
It should rise like a souffle and remain both light and airy even after it has cooled down.

This makes a delicious sunday lunch pudding. It is full of the clementines flavours and packed with a gloopy syrup that contains a fair share of vitamin C plus some energizing essential oil from the clementines skin itself. Perfect for anybody who doesn’t enjoy flour or is gluten intolerant.
This cake was inspired I believe by a recipe from Nigella Lawson that I tore from a magazine years ago.
I never throw away a recipe!

Our Easter lunch pudding