Tag Archives: duck egg

“Oeuf cocotte” : Savoury cream eggs with truffle paste and oil

I am very excited about sharing this recipe! Maybe it is its simplicity, or its taste combination, or maybe it is the fact we are approaching Easter but I feel really excited about posting this…

It was in a cold train station, very early one morning, that I tasted this dish and was instantly hooked! This little cream pot with a soft runny egg in the middle revived memories of the ham and egg “oeuf cocotte” I used to be served as a child – a comforting, protein-packed and tasty starter…

If you don’t want to splash on truffle oil or truffle paste, you can just replace it with chopped ham and a pinch of sweet paprika. Both versions work just as well but I had bought Truffle oil and Truffle paste from Tartufaia Truffles  in Borough Market as a Christmas treat and a dash of both elevated a simple family dish to new heights of deliciousness!!! I prefer using duck eggs for this because there is more of it and they cook slower than hen ones so you are less likely to overdo them ; but any egg will do – just adjust the cooking time to the size.

Duck egg in truffle cream

Duck egg in truffle cream

Steams in 10 minutes

Steams in 10 minutes

Ingredients list: 

  • Duck egg
  • Crème fraîche, 1 large Tbsp
  • Truffle oil and/or shaved truffle, 1 tsp
  • Sea salt

Take an oven-proof small dish like a “ramequins” or dariole mould and put a large dollop of crême fraîche in it. Push the curved side of your spoon in to create a dip. Crack your duck egg inside the dip. Dribble some truffle oil and add some truffle shavings (or use some Tartuffaia truffle paste if you can). Truffles are an expensive treat but you only need a little oil or paste to release the most powerful aroma so it is worth making the effort.

Steam in an electric steamer or in a pan with a little water for under 10 minutes. Stop the cooking as soon as the yolk start to set. The white will set before the yolk does and so the result is a soft boiled egg in a dish!

Serve boiling hot with a small pinch of sea salt. Add some buttered “soldiers” on the side! This is regressive and blissful cooking…

For the ham and paprika version: Just chop some cooked ham over the cream and add a pinch of smoked paprika on the egg. Success is guaranteed!IMG_9007

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Burn’s night haggis and duck egg tartlet

Tonight is Burn’s Night, in which the Scots eat Haggis and drink whiskies, recite Burn’s poetry to the sound of bag pipes and generally have a song and a dance around one of the weirdest food stuff possible!

I happen to really enjoy Haggis and I share with my Franco-English brood a very candid love for the full flavours of this ancient and mythical dish. So we usually share at least one Haggis with friends during the months of January or February.  The Haggis itself is best bought from your butcher and if you follow the instructions you should be set ! What I suggest here is what to do the next day with the left-overs – I always buy generously and so the left-over is quite plentiful. You could always just purchase a small haggis, cook it for the time required and use it in this recipe. I reckon this starter is an easy and user-friendly introduction to the real thing…

A sausage shaped haggis ! Perfect

A sausage shaped haggis ! Perfect

Ingredients for 6 tartlets:

  • 500g of Haggis (cooked and cooled)
  • one egg, beaten
  • Fine oatmeal or brown flour
  • Duck eggs, 6
  • Maldon salt
  • Little glass of whisky

Poach the duck eggs directly in boiling water (with a spoonful of vinegar added) or in small darioles moulds stood in one inch of boiling water. Count 3 to 4 minutes after boiling point to get soft boiled eggs. Rinse under cool water, peel and reserve.

Put one spoonful of rapeseed oil in a skillet and heat up.

With oiled hands, shape 100g of haggis in round tartlet shape or flat pat tie and brush both sides in the beaten egg. Add a bit of water with your fingers if this helps. Sprinkle the fine oatmeal over and then fry both sides in oil. Repeat for 6 rounds.

Drain the excess oil on some kitchen towel then serve the Haggis base with one poached egg on top and sprinkle some salt over.

Serve with a sprinkle of whisky on the haggis base.

Each guest will cut the egg : the soft yolk mingling with the spicy haggis meat and the alcool gives a lovely and very unusual mouthful. Some bag-pipe music might always be enjoyable at that point but if you want to really get the full experience of Burn’s Night you can always try reciting the traditional address or heading to a Scottish pub during the next three or four weeks and seeing how it is done properly!

In any case, this is a night for loud and rowdy fun and for eating things you never thought you would love! Never miss an opportunity to party, is my honest advice for this new year. And may the memory last long after Burn’s Night is over…

I took no picture of the starter sadly but here is a picture of the whole Haggis, ready to be cut up, the night before…

A robust and fragrant Haggis

A robust and fragrant Haggis